Archive | June, 2018

That time I was in the The Daily Show audience

13 Jun

The last time (read: one and only time) I was in a live studio audience it was a rather disappointing experience. It was for a show I didn’t watch with guests I wasn’t familiar with and they never even showed the audience on TV. I needed to have another, better, experience with a show I actually watch. So when I decided to go to New York for a few days to meet up with Stephen, I immediately booked a ticket for The Daily Show. I’ve watched The Daily Show on a daily basis for years now, ever since it popped up on Sky on demand. I went from being someone who was completely apathetic about politics and news to someone who can’t get enough of it. Obviously, as a trained journalist I get my news from multiple sources, but the Daily Show does a good job of highlighting the headlines with humor (and a little left-leaning bias). I was excited to witness how the proverbial sausage was made.

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This sign is hanging above the door to the studio

Because I booked the ticket about 3 weeks in advance, the guaranteed tickets were sold out, which meant I got a non-guaranteed ticket. Which meant I had to queue. As an honorary Brit and day seat connoisseur, I am no stranger to standing in line outside of theaters. I just had to figure out the all-important question: what time to arrive? Because the only thing worse than showing up an hour earlier than needed is showing up 5 minutes too late. The ticket said I had to arrive by 5pm, but online comments suggested I get there by 4pm. I played it safe and arrived around 3:35pm. There was a decent amount of people ahead of me — perhaps around 30? — and by the time 5pm arrived, there were at least 50 people behind me. When it got close to 5pm, a producer came out and explained the process. Once they determined how many seats they had available and how many guaranteed ticket holders showed up, they’d start allowing us in. “In” being into the next queue, of course. Then we’d go through airport-like security before going into the studio. A little after 5pm they let a big group of people at the front of the line move forward, which of course meant they cut the line 3 people in front of me. I was going to be so mad if I came that close to going in! Fortunately as the guaranteed ticket holders made their way into the studio, they let a second group of unguaranteed in. A producer with an iPad came around and took our names to verify our reservations and handed us numbered tickets.

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“You needed to book a ticket online? I thought it was free!” The guy three people ahead of me said. The producer was as nice as she could have been about it, but she couldn’t let him in without a booking. He waited almost two hours for nothing! As much as it sucks, I’m glad they stick to their rules. A couple girls with guaranteed tickets showed up at 5:05pm, but since they missed the 5pm cut off, they were sent to the very back of the unguaranteed line. Around 5:15pm another producer came out and told us it was our last chance to use the restroom before going into the studio, as once we were seated, we couldn’t leave until filming was over. The guy behind me went nuts, complaining about how you can’t do that to people — not let them pee for two hours! — some people have medical conditions! But as far as I know, he survived. I went down to the bathroom in the basement before rejoining my place in the queue outside. Eventually I made it through security and was escorted into the theater. It’s a bit of a cliche, but it was indeed surreal walking across the set of The Daily Show to find my seat. I was lucky to be seated close to the center instead of on the very end of the row.

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Once all the seats were filled, they played a little safety video starring all of the correspondents, with cheeky tips like “if a joke is made about a black person, look to your nearest black person and only laugh if they’re laughing.” Everyone laughed at that. One thing The Daily Show did differently than The Jonathan Ross Show did in London was that they allowed us to take photos and use our phones up until the taping began. This made it much more enjoyable to kill time, plus everyone knows “pics or it didn’t happen,” so a selfie with the set in the background is necessary. Around 6pm, the warmup comedian came out to get everyone hyped up. Instead of making us do embarrassing dance moves like Johnathan Ross’s guy did, he mostly did crowd work, asking people where they were from and what they did for work and riffing on that. He was really funny and got everyone laughing, clapping and whooping. I expected there to be more instructions — indications to applaud, etc, but they basically just told us to “lose our sh*t.” A little after 6:30pm the main producer came out, which the comedian said was a sign the show was going to start soon.

“How much longer?” the comedian asked. I figured he would say “5 minutes.”

“30 seconds!” he said. Then suddenly the intro theme song started playing and all of us rose to our feet, clapping and cheering. Even though I had already waited 3 hours for this 30-min taping, it felt like it was all happening so soon. When Trevor came out the audience truly did “lose their sh*t.” He sat down, looked directly at the camera, then jumped right into the show. When the commercial break came, a bevy of I’m assuming writers and producers rushed the stage to talk to Trevor. When they left he finally acknowledged us, which, of course, made everyone “lose their sh*t.” I had read in reviews of the taping that Trevor likes to interact with the audience during the commercial breaks, but I have to admit, a lot of his interaction felt scripted. Like he was using the material written for him that got cut from the show. He continued to rip on how cheap EPA chief Scott Pruitt is, which was the main story of the first half of the show. When the show resumed, it was interesting to watch what Trevor did when the news clips or taped pieces were playing. A lot of times he laughed along, or just stared straight ahead into the camera, working on the correct facial expression to have when the camera turned back to him. The guest that night was actress Regina King. I was expecting the interview to go long like on The Johnathan Ross Show and they’d edit together the best bits, but what they filmed was what aired. I’m still glad I went to the taping, but the audience members don’t get to see anything extra that the audience at home misses out on. (Except maybe Trevor’s killer dance moves while he’s standing up waiting to introduce the moment of zen at the end!) When the taping ended, Trevor thanked us all once again, then rushed back to the green room. Row by row we were escorted out of the studio.

I finally had a good live studio audience experience! That night I watched the show with the sole purpose of looking for myself in the audience. After the interview with Regina King, if you paused in the right moment and squinted, you could almost see me!

Daily Show audience

Which is more than I can say about The Jonathan Ross Show. Since it involved so much waiting around, I probably wouldn’t go to a taping every time I’m in New York City, but I’m really glad I went this time!

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